Construction, Manufacturing, and Sustainability

Rockford Construction aligns with Rigid Global

Contractor makes progress on new west side headquarters.

December 29, 2012
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Rockford Construction is starting the New Year with a new partnership.

Rockford, which celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2012, has partnered with Rigid Global Buildings, a leading national manufacturer of pre-engineered steel buildings. The local firm is now an authorized builder for the Houston-based company.

Rockford officials said they aligned with Rigid because both companies share a “mutual vision for quality, performance and sustainability.”

Metal buildings have the reputation of being the most sustainable. The structures are made from recycled materials and can be recycled again, which means the materials stay out of the landfills.

The buildings can be used for one- and two-story construction and for small jobs from, say, 400 square feet to large warehouses and manufacturing structures. Pre-engineered steel buildings are seen by some as a more cost-efficient alternative to conventional steel structures.

In addition to metal, steel and pre-engineered buildings, Rigid also makes metal roof panels and metal wall panels. By aligning with Rigid, Rockford can provide turn-key services for metal-building projects.

On another front, progress is being made on Rockford’s new headquarters at 601 First St. NW. Much of the demolition work has been done on the former Miller Products building at the corner of First Street and Seward Avenue.

Rockford is investing $4.7 million into the renovation, which will deliver 35,000 square feet of office space. The revitalized building will have a green roof, an interior courtyard and some covered parking, and the entire project will be done to LEED standards.

When the work is completed, the firm will have about 100 employees at the site.

Rockford bought the building from Comerica Bank for nearly $900,000 in the fall of 2011. The bank closed on the property after Miller Products closed in October 2008. The city awarded Rockford a brownfield for the project because the property was contaminated by the platings and coatings Miller Products used for the better part of five decades before going out of business.

Rockford estimated it would cost roughly $1.1 million just to clean up the site; the brownfield will allow the company to receive a tax reimbursement for its remediation work.

Kara Wood, city economic development director, said the reimbursement from tax-increment financing would likely take 14 years to be completed.

Rockford got its start in 1987 and has been consistently ranked by Engineering News Record as one of the top 400 contractors in the nation. The company has 200 employees in Grand Rapids and Bonita Springs, Fla., and builds projects in 44 states.

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