Architecture & Design, Construction, and Government

Commissioners OK design and engineering contracts

Twenty-five local firms will have chance to work on city projects.

March 22, 2013
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Grand Rapids city commissioners supported two requests from City Engineer Marc De Clercq last week, which means a dozen architectural firms and a baker’s dozen of engineering companies will have a shot at $3.5 million in future city-funded projects.

Both the architectural firms and engineering companies will augment the work done by the city’s engineering department. The office has a variety of projects come across its desk, and the department isn’t large enough to handle the workload on its own.

The architects will help with evaluating facilities, planning and programming, project development, and preliminary and conceptual design, along with other functions. Commissioners allocated $1.5 million for those services, money that will come from each project’s budget.

De Clercq told commissioners that, due to the variety of projects the city undertakes, it would be in the city’s best interest to have a number of firms onboard because that would give the department a wide range of professional expertise to call on.

Chosen from 18 firms that submitted proposals for the work were: Byce & Associates; Century A&E; Cornerstone Architects; Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber; GMB AE; Kingscott Associates; O’Boyle, Cowell, Blalock & Associates; Post Associates; Progressive AE; SKO & Associates; URS Corp.; and Virdis Design Group.

Members of the city’s engineering and facilities management departments reviewed the proposals and selected the firms. The agreement runs for three years.

Another three-year agreement has the following performing engineering services for the city: Carl Walker; CDM Michigan; FTC&H; Geotech; GMB AE; Hubbell, Roth & Clark; Jones & Henry; Malcom Prinie; Moore & Bruggink; NTH Consultants; Tetra Tech MPS; Walker Parking Consultants & Engineers; and Williams & Works.

Commissioners allocated $2 million for these services with the funds also to come from the specific project budgets.

The engineering contract is actually an extension of one approved in March 2011, also for $2 million. Seven months later, commissioners allocated an additional $2 million for those services.

Both the architectural and engineering contracts run into March 2016.

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