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NET(net) acquires Oracle Optimization

March 26, 2013
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Holland's NET(net) acquires Los Angeles-based Oracle Optimization

A West Michigan IT consultancy has acquired a West Coast one.

NET(net) Inc., a Holland-based global provider of comprehensive IT investment optimization services, recently acquired Oracle Optimization,an independent Los Angeles-based Oracle configuration and cost optimization consultant.

Kellsey Le, CEO of NET, said the deal is a critical acquisition for her company and has been in negotiation since the latter part of 2012. Oracle Optimization will remain in L.A., servicing NET clients from there virtually and through conference calls, she said, adding that no major position changes will be made.

This deal was made mainly with intellectual property acquisition in mind, Le said., Although Oracle Optimization and NET are not affiliated with Oracle, the major multinational technology corporation does have customers that turn to both Oracle Optimization and NET for assistance, and they do provide clients with the tools to figure out Oracle’s software and best tech deals.

“This was an intellectual property acquisition. (Oracle Optimization has) some tools that can read how a client is using Oracle licenses. It gives us a leg up in terms of analysis that we didn’t have before,” she said. “It’s a tool we’re going to rename and utilize for all our clients.”

The tool will first be used internally to augment NET’s service engagement, but could be commercialized in a few years, Le said.

NET, located at 217 E. 24th St., Holland, has locations in the Cayman Islands, Guernsey and Singapore. Over the past 10 years, the company has serviced about 1,500 active engagements globally, Le said, although not many of those have been in West Michigan.

As a third-party service provider that helps customers get better deals from the behemoth vendor, Le said there are mixed emotions regarding the give-and-take role between companies like NET and Oracle. In a sense, they help each other; in another sense, they compete.

“They need to sell software and we’re about making sure our clients get better deals. We have different paths,” she said. “It’s a love/hate relationship.”

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