Real Estate, Retail, and Small Business & Startups

Denim store fits into downtown

April 15, 2014
TAGS Denym
Print
Text Size:
A A
Denim store fits into downtown
The Denym store in Grand Rapids will sell premium denim clothes and accessories for men and women. Photo via fb.com

A homegrown denim retailer is moving into downtown Grand Rapids.

Denym

Denym plans to open in mid May at a 2,200-square-foot space, at 443 Bridge St. NW.

Denym, a play on the word denim, will sell premium denim clothes and accessories for men and women, said owner Katie Harney, who previously managed Blue Boutique for Goodwill Industries of Greater Grand Rapids.

The store will feature brands such as Joe’s Jeans, Hudson Jeans, 7 for all Mankind and Henry & Belle.

Denym plans to market its style to professionals between 25-45, Harney said.

Jeans will typically cost anywhere from $100-$200.

“Owning my own store has always been a dream of mine,” Harney said. “I have background in interior design and have worked in retail and customer service. I want to keep it local and personal.”

Harney said she’s planning to hire about two or three part-time staff, and anyone who wants to apply can email info at denymgr dot com.

Denym moved into the space around the end of March and only had to make minor painting renovations, said Katie’s husband, Steve Harney, who’s a principal at Grand Rapids-based Full Circle, a marketing firm.

West side

Steve Harney has been helping promote the store’s opening and said his wife is excited to be part of a retail re-birth on the city’s west side.

“I think the west side is seeing a resurgence of people interested in bringing back the historic character to that area,” Harney said. “It’s walk-able. There’s parking."

Harney added that it's easier to park and maneuver on the west side than the downtown Monroe area.

Harney said real estate firms are doing a lot to develop the area.

Retail on the west side could begin “booming” in three to five years, he said.

“It’s certainly possible, but hard to predict,” Harney said. “One of challenges of downtown is there isn’t a lot of space to cluster retail together. People want to park once and walk and shop. There’s a challenge of how to get multiple retailers to group together . . . forming shopping clusters.” 

Recent Articles by Mike Nichols

Editor's Picks

Comments powered by Disqus