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Benefits company dials next call center

November 12, 2014
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Benefits company dials next Las Vegas call center
Ada-based Next Generation Enrollment offers benefits administration services. Photo via nextgenerationenrollment.com

A benefits administration company has opened a second call center in Las Vegas to support its growing client base and infrastructure needs.

Next Generation Enrollment in Ada said last month that it has opened the call center to expand its service hours and increase the reliability of its infrastructure to support its growing number of clients. The call center is located just southwest of downtown Las Vegas, at 3320 W. Sahara Ave.

Next Generation Enrollment provides an online portal for managing benefits, as well as a call center option to support employers and their employees.

The company, founded in 2004, offers benefits administration services for small, medium and large employers: COBRA and HIPAA administration; voluntary benefit enrollments; health care reform services; dependent eligibility audits; and Flexible Spending Account, Health Reimbursement Arrangement and Health Savings Account administration.

The Las Vegas choice

Bradley Taylor, CEO of Next Generation Enrollment, said the company selected Las Vegas based on the number of existing call center professionals in the area and its location in the Pacific Time Zone.

“We were growing our customer base to where we had clients in Central Time Zone, just across the U.S., and we wanted to offer more hours when we would be available,” Taylor said. “We also wanted the redundancy and backup for when we lost power or Internet here in Grand Rapids, so we knew another separate location would be necessary for that outside of the service area.”

Taylor said the company also choose Las Vegas because of its large population of trained and educated Spanish speakers and the fairly inexpensive cost to travel there.

Bringing call center online

After a three-week training period, the second call center opened with 22 new employees and is anticipated to increase to 50 positions by 2016, based on the company’s current growth rate.

“We have been sending people from here out to train them,” Taylor said. “The manager who is out there has spent three weeks in the office in Michigan learning the business.

"They have been doing a good job, as our business is very complicated and very customized in what we do. We answer employer benefits questions for our clients, and every client is unique. There is a lot that they have been tasked with learning, so we have tried to keep it simple for them and make sure the materials they are given are helpful.”

Since opening the second call center, Taylor said the client feedback has been positive and already proven to be helpful in terms of infrastructure support.

“They are excited. They are appreciative. When someone is in California . . . they are excited about having those extra hours,” Taylor said. “Overall, we are very happy. We have definitely needed their help, and we were down for 45 minutes . . . just the other day. Just like we had hoped, they were unaffected and kept taking calls in the meantime.”

Growth in health care “education”

With a majority of clients with networks spread across the country and in service industries such as hospitality and health care, Taylor said Next Generation Enrollment has grown to more than 100 employees from 30 employees in February 2013, due to an increase in talk times and a need to understand insurance coverage.

“We have landed a lot of larger accounts, and they require more call center and other resources to service them,” Taylor said. “With health care reform, people seem a lot more engaged in their insurance than in the past and that requires more education.

“More than 60 people are now working in our office in Ada, and we are busting at the seams, and that was another reason why — we just didn’t have any more room here. We are still growing aggressively in West Michigan.” 

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