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Judge sentences ex-farm employees for conspiracy

October 8, 2015
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Ford pulling tractor
A pulling tractor competes at an event. Photo via wikimedia.org

Two more former Stamp Farms employees have been sentenced for conspiring to conceal assets in the bankruptcy case involving the former Decatur business.

Brothers Andrew and Robert Trowbridge of South Haven were sentenced Oct. 7 in Western District of Michigan Court for conspiring to conceal assets from the Stamp Farms bankruptcy trustee, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Western District of Michigan, which is part of the Department of Justice, yesterday.

Robert Trowbridge also made a fraudulent crop insurance claim, according to investigators.

U.S. District Judge Robert Holmes Bell sentenced each brother to one year of probation, a $10,000 fine and 200 hours of community service.

Case details

The DOJ said the Trowbridge brothers hid a high-performance pulling tractor from the Stamp Farms bankruptcy trustee and lied about it during bankruptcy proceedings.

The Ghost Rider pulling tractor was worth more than $100,000.

Robert Trowbridge also made a fraudulent claim for approximately $50,000 in crop insurance and accepted payment of more than $22,000 that was concealed from the bankruptcy trustee.

The Trowbridges ultimately returned the pulling tractor, and Robert Trowbridge re-paid some of the assets he concealed from the bankruptcy trustee.

The Trowbridges told Judge Bell they committed these crimes at Stamp Farms owner Michael Stamp’s request.

Ongoing case

To date, five former Stamp Farms employees have been convicted of federal felonies for their involvement in crimes arising from their employment there, including Melissa Stamp, Michael’s wife, who is serving a 21-month sentence for hiding approximately $200,000 of bankruptcy assets.

The government said it is continuing its criminal investigation.

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