Human Resources, Law, and Nonprofits

Trial lawyer organization elects attorney as fellow

October 4, 2016
Print
Text Size:
A A
John O'Loughlin
John O'Loughlin. Courtesy Smith Haughey Rice & Roegge

A local attorney has been inducted into an organization for trial lawyers that accepts one percent of the “total lawyer population of any state or province.”

John “Jack” O’Loughlin, of Smith Haughey Rice & Roegge’s Grand Rapids office, has been elected as a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers.

For more than 30 years, the firm said O’Loughlin has successfully defended hundreds of physicians, nurses, hospitals and other health care professionals against claims of medical malpractice.

He has tried dozens of cases in front of judges and juries throughout Michigan.

O’Loughlin has been named a "Michigan Super Lawyer" and a "Local Litigation Star" in Benchmark Litigation.

He graduated from Indiana University, where he earned both his J.D. and B.S.

L.R. “Bud” Roegge, Smith Haughey founding partner, said O’Loughlin has an “outstanding record of trial advocacy and ethical dealings that are never in question.”

“This is a wonderful, well-deserved honor for a man who embodies all that is good about our profession,” said Bill Jack, CEO and shareholder, Smith Haughey.

“Best” trial lawyers

Founded in 1950, the American College of Trial Lawyers is composed of the “best of the trial bars” from the U.S. and Canada.

Fellowship is extended by invitation only and “only after careful investigation” to experienced trial lawyers, who have mastered the “art of advocacy” and whose careers have been “marked by the highest standards of ethical conduct, professionalism, civility and collegiality.”

Lawyers must have a minimum of 15 years of trial experience before they can be considered for fellowship.

There are about 5,800 members.

The college maintains and seeks to improve the standards of trial practice, professionalism, ethics and the administration of justice, through education and public statements on important legal issues relating to its mission.

It “strongly supports” the independence of the judiciary, trial by jury, respect for the rule of law, access to justice and the fair and just representation of all parties to legal proceedings. 

Recent Articles by Charlsie Dewey

Editor's Picks

Comments powered by Disqus