Health Care and Lakeshore

Neuroscience clinic opens on lakeshore

October 26, 2016
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Phil Gorelick
Gorelick

A lakeshore community is getting a new neuroscience clinic thanks to a recent affiliation agreement between two area health care providers.

Mercy Health announced that it is opening the Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences clinic in Grand Haven in the Dunewood Medical Center, 1310 Wisconsin Ave., adjacent to North Ottawa Community Health System.

Mercy Health said the clinic will support the “growing number” of lakeshore residents in need of neurological disease care, specifically for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and stroke-related maladies.

The clinic will provide diagnosis and comprehensive treatment so patients can see a clinician close to home. Testing services include memory tests, brain scans and other neurodiagnostic testing.

The clinic announcement comes just a few months after NOCHS and Mercy Health entered into an affiliation agreement designed to “strengthen health care and patient services along the lakeshore,” including expanding access to primary care, cardiology and neuroscience specialists.

Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences is under the leadership of Dr. Philip B. Gorelick, described by Mercy Health as a “world-renowned expert,” who has been recognized as “one of the top stroke neurologists in the U.S.”

The new neurology clinic will be staffed with three rotating general neurologists from the Mercy Health Hauenstein Neuroscience Center in Grand Rapids: Dr. Christopher Goshgarian, Dr. David Ehrhardt and Dr. Emily Johnson.

Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences specializes in the areas of epilepsy, spine and brain disorders, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer's disease, sleep disorders, strokes, dementia and overall nervous system care.

Patients needing additional treatment may be referred to Mercy Health Hauenstein Neuroscience Center in Grand Rapids.

Haney Assaad, M.D., NOCHS vice president of medical affairs, said individuals over the age of 65 are expected to increase by more than 35 percent in the hospital’s service area, creating a growing need for neuroscience services.

“The Health Care Advisory Board believes that neurological disease incidences with an aging population is growing by double digits annually, especially in the areas of stroke, sleep disorders and Alzheimer’s,” Assaad said.

Mercy Health said as part of its roll-out efforts, it will be reaching out to “several hundred primary care physicians and their patients from Ludington to Holland.”

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