Health Care, Human Resources, and Small Business & Startups

Wellness provider targets small business

OnSite Wellness gears web- and app-based health education packages toward smaller companies with limited resources.

November 24, 2017
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Mary Kline left Amy Ritsema
Mary Kline, left, and Amy Ritsema are trying to make it easier for small businesses to participate in health education for their employees. Courtesy Onsite Wellness

As small business owners, Amy Ritsema and Mary Kline understand the challenge of administering programs for employees while wearing multiple hats.

To help their clients address that struggle — and give them a perk to boost employee attraction and retention — the co-owners of Grand Rapids-based OnSite Wellness recently designed two packages for virtual wellness education.

Small Business Solution and Small Business Solution Plus are available for companies with 100 employees or less and focus on “the four pillars of well-being”: moving more, finding balance, eating well and self-care.

One pillar will be addressed each quarter of the year using app- and web-based education, wearable fitness devices, incentives and results reporting.

OnSite Wellness is a team of exercise science, nutrition and health professionals who are certified in worksite wellness and coaching.

Ritsema said most of her company’s clients are small- or mid-sized businesses. Up to this point, OnSite has offered only custom solutions — including biometric screenings, wellness challenges, lifestyle coaching, educational opportunities, tobacco cessation and stress management — rather than packages.

“The customized type of program isn’t necessarily what a small business is looking for because it wouldn’t be as cost-effective for them,” she said.

The Small Business Solution package costs $87 per employee, with a minimum charge of $2,500. Small Business Solution Plus costs $114 per person, with a baseline charge of $3,300.

OnSite’s customized wellness solutions are priced based on specific, requested services, so it’s harder to estimate costs.

Although one or two employees dealing with illness or stress can have a disproportionate effect on a small business’s output, Ritsema said it is hard for company owners to take steps toward prevention programs because of time constraints.

“Small Business Solution is an in-the-box solution that is easy to implement and not really time-consuming,” she said. “It would be simple to administer on the business side, with support from us.”

The Small Business Solution package includes wellness portal access; a health questionnaire, mobile app, wearable device and app integration; an incentive- and points-based approach; quarterly programming and participation reporting; annual incentive reporting; a monthly wellness newsletter; help-desk support; online wellness classes; paper- and online-based wellness challenges; nonverified tracking; and aggregate reporting.

The Small Business Solution Plus package offers all of those features, plus verified tracking, which “allows participants to submit proof of participation to OnSite, and we will upload their participation activities into the wellness portal,” Ritsema said.

Other services can be added to the packages for a fee, including biometric screenings, live wellness classes, flu shots, on-site visits and coaching, tracking doctor results, phone coaching and aggregate report reviews.

Of OnSite Wellness’s current roster of 52 clients, Ritsema estimated two or three would be eligible for the new packages. The company hopes to draw more clients who wouldn’t otherwise have used its services.

“In our opinion, employees are valuable, no matter the size of the company,” Ritsema said. “We put the Small Business Solution in place … to help serve that area of the business population better.”

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