Higher Education and Human Resources

College hosts national speakers for MLK week

January 12, 2017
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Kimberlé Crenshaw
Kimberlé Crenshaw. Courtesy GVSU

A local college is hosting several nationally known speakers to commemorate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Grand Valley State University plans to host several events next week on topics such as race, activism, gender inclusion and the media.

Speakers will include authors, organizers, professors and journalists.

All events are free and open to the public.

The events are presented in partnership with GVSU’s Division of Inclusion and Equity.

More information about the week is online.

Kevin Powell

Kevin Powell will speak at 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 16 in the Fieldhouse Arena on the Allendale campus.

Powell is an activist, author and president of BK Nation, a national organization based in New York centered on grassroots activism, pop culture, technology and social media. He has written 12 books; the most recent is “The Education of Kevin Powell: A Boy’s Journey into Manhood.”

Nikole Hannah-Jones and Jason Riley

The Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies will host Race and the American Dream at 7 p.m. on Jan. 17, in the Eberhard Center.

Nikole Hannah-Jones, staff writer at the New York Times Magazine, will join Jason Riley, columnist and editorial board member at the Wall Street Journal, for a dialogue on the progress that has been made since the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s, as well as the challenges that continue to exist.

The event will be moderated by Kyle Caldwell, executive director of the Johnson Center for Philanthropy at GVSU.

GVSU asks that attendees of Race and the American Dream RSVP online.

Kimberlé Crenshaw

Kimberlé Crenshaw will speak at 4:30 p.m. on Jan. 18, in the Kirkhof Center, Grand River Room, Allendale Campus. The presentation will also be simulcast in the DeVos Center’s Loosemore Auditorium on the Pew campus.

Crenshaw is a professor of law at UCLA and Columbia law schools. She coined two terms — critical race theory and intersectionality — that have been used in many areas of study. She is a voice in calling for a gender-inclusive approach to racial justice interventions, having spearheaded the Why We Can’t Wait Campaign and co-authored “Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected” and “Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women.”

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