Economic Development, Health Care, and Human Resources

Agency releases list of 100 'Hot Jobs' in West Michigan

February 8, 2019
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West Michigan Works! is reporting that the majority of the top 100 jobs in the region’s high-growth industries are in manufacturing and health sciences.

The workforce development agency released today its 2019 “Hot Jobs” list, an annual publication that examines the job market in Allegan, Barry, Ionia, Kent, Montcalm, Muskegon and Ottawa counties.

The list, which contains multiple tabs, is available on the West Michigan Works! website.

“The ‘Hot Jobs’ list provides sound guidance for students, job seekers and our workforce partners,” said Jacob Maas, CEO, West Michigan Works!. “We’re grateful to the many regional industry councils and employers who provide input into the ‘Hot Jobs’ list.”

Grand Rapids Community College is one of the institutions that uses the “Hot Jobs” list as a guide.

“The West Michigan Works! ‘Hot Jobs’ list is a critical tool that we use with current and potential students to help them identify a career path,” said Julie Parks, executive director of workforce training, GRCC. “The ‘Hot Jobs’ list is also used by our faculty and staff to ensure GRCC remains relevant and responsive to our community.”

West Michigan Works! staff use the “Hot Jobs” list as “an important internal tool” to begin discussions around career exploration, to identify existing skills that would transfer into high-demand occupations and to inform decisions regarding funding for occupational training.

The list also identifies careers that are eligible for training scholarships.

Methodology

High-demand occupations are defined as those that have a significant number of open positions in today’s job market, are expected to see considerable growth in the next five years and can lead to self-sufficiency through living wages and opportunities for advancement.

To create the list, West Michigan Works! gathered state labor market information and data from job analytic programs.

The data was then presented to employers who provided feedback and insights to create an accurate representation of the regional hiring needs.

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