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Financial advisers rank among tops in US

June 19, 2019
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Scott Bernecker
Scott Bernecker. Courtesy Merrill Lynch

Four local financial advisers have been named among the nation's best by an industry publication.

Three Grand Rapids Merrill Lynch Wealth Management advisers — Scott Bernecker, Timothy Long and David Lund — and Michael Rosloniec, a Morgan Stanley Graystone Consulting adviser in Grand Rapids, this spring were included on the 2019 Financial Times "Top 400 Financial Advisors" list or "FT 400."

The list “provides a snapshot of the best professionals at traditional U.S. broker-dealers,” according to FT.

Honorees

Bernecker joined Merrill Lynch in 1997 as a financial planning specialist. He is a graduate of the Michigan State University Broad College of Business, where he earned a degree in general management.

Long joined Merrill Lynch in 1994 and is a member of Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s Global Institutional Consulting, a specialized group comprised of experienced institutional consultants. He graduated from the University of Michigan Ross School of Business and holds an M.B.A. from St. John’s University in New York.

Lund joined Merrill Lynch in 1997 as an intern while working his way through college. He currently leads a 14-member financial advisory team. He is a graduate of Great Lakes Christian College and the Michigan State University Broad College of Business, where he earned degrees in religious education and finance.

Rosloniec is an institutional consulting director and family wealth director with Morgan Stanley Graystone Consulting, where he has worked for over 16 years. He serves as vice chair and trustee for the Grand Rapids Community Foundation, among other community service roles. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan.

"FT 400"

Through its sister company, Ignite Research, the Financial Times last fall contacted the largest U.S. brokerages to obtain data on their top advisers across the nation.

Qualifying advisers had to have more than 10 years of experience and $300 million or more in assets under management.

About 940 qualified candidates then were invited to fill out a survey about their practice. FT used that information along with data from regulatory filings to grade the advisers on six factors: assets under management, or AUM; AUM growth rate; years of experience; compliance record; industry certifications; and online accessibility.

The results form an unranked list FT refers to as an “elite group” of advisers.

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